RSS

Why Do Roses Need Their Light?

I am going to reply this question simply by showing you some pictures. Do you see any difference between these:

roses without light

roses without light
and these:
roses planted in full light

roses planted in full light

roses planted in full light





They were all planted last autumn, they are all from the same variety. Unfortunately with the first we did the huge mistake of hoping that the trees below which they were planted will allow some sun through. Big mistake.

Roses need at least 6 full hours of bright light to grow and shade will only produce what you see in the first two pictures - small, weak plants that have never been in bloom this year.

So, make sure that you choose the correct planting place or the result will be complete failure even if the roses you plant come from a strong and healthy variety.

Take care,
Geo

Barkarole - an Elegant and Grand Rose



Barkarole (Black rose) is my favorite rose variety that I simply can't stop buying and planting in my garden - I have over 20 and they are still not enough.

Breeder: Hans J├╝rgen Evers (Germany, 1988) and Mathias Tantau, Jr. (1912 - 2006) (Germany, 1988).
Color: dark (very dark) red;
Perfume: moderate;
Class: Tea Hybrid Roses;

The only picture that I have unfortunately is the one above from my favorite supplier (multeplante.ro). This summer I will be able to provide more, many many more.

One more thing that needs to be mentioned here - the best song that goes with this rose, is also one that I can't stop listening to. It's called "Barcarolle" (surprise!) by Offenbach. One of the best interpretations is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbbfU0akfLE.

Enjoy,
Geo

Roses no. 91 to 110 - All Miniature Roses

Just when I was sure that winter is a dead time of the year, there was a big surprise for me.
After a horrible day in the office, I went with a friend to a local supermarket for some supplies. Big surprise for me: they had a sale on miniature roses:

Miniature roses

Miniature roses

I bought 5 pots and discovered at home that each pot had 4 roses inside - so 20 more roses for my garden.
They will stay inside until April and they will be planted most probably near the pond during spring.

Miniature roses
Miniature roses look exactly like regular roses only that they are much smaller (about a quarter in size) and are suitable for smaller places, along the alleys or near larger roses as border. They have the same needs of water, fertilizer and protection during winter.

I recommend miniature roses especially to those of you who don't have large gardens or no gardens at all and want to keep them in your balcony or even in a pot on your window. They are great balcony or patio plants but remember they need also minimum 6 hours of sun/day.

Miniature roses

Miniature roses

So this is how I got my 91 to 110 roses during December when I least expected it.
They make my house and my life more colorful during winter when there's plenty of snow outside.

Take care,
Geo

Create Your Very Own Rose Garden with Minimum Costs - Part 5 - Cut Your Roses



Cutting the roses can be done in autumn, right after planting them, in spring, after frost danger is gone or throughout the blooming period, immediately after flowers wither.

In autumn – it is recommended to avoid cutting the plant too deep especially if frost is coming; better don’t do it at all and wait until spring. Freshly cut branches are more vulnerable to frost.

In spring – after frost danger is gone, roses are cut to make the bush younger; first of all remove all frozen parts and then you can focus on the rest. Cutting helps the rose bush grow young and fresh branches – so don’t be afraid to cut, but since this is a brochure for beginner rose lovers, I recommend a specialist in doing this for you or I will come back with more information later on. 

Throughout the year:
1.       It is recommended that the first flowers of a rose are cut off to allow the bush to grow stronger; since this is almost impossible as everybody wants to see the flowers in bloom sooner, most of you probably won’t bother with this piece of advice;
2.       It is also recommended that withered flowers are cut off to allow the rose bush to focus on new buds that will grow stronger and more beautiful. This I am sure you will do.

Climbers in Schonbrunn Gardens, Vienna, Austria
Climbers in Schonbrunn Gardens, Vienna, Austria

                These being said, I wish you the best of luck with your rose gardens and please visit my blog from time to time for more ideas, advice and update on my 10,000 roses dream garden.

Please find parts 1 to 5 here: http://10000-roses.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

Take care,
Geo

Create Your Very Own Rose Garden with Minimum Costs - Part 4 - Protect Your Roses



Winter frost is one of the biggest enemies that roses have. When frost prepares to strike, you need to be ready. Here’s what you can do for your roses:

1.       Place piles of loose soil on the plant to protect it from the frost. Even if some of the longer branches freeze, the roots and the main larger ones will be safe; frozen branches will be cut off in spring and fresh, young branches will grow:
  My older roses under piles of soil

My older roses under piles of soil

2.       Place plastic bottles around newly planted roses to create a greenhouse effect – the sun will warm the bottles and keep the rose under a decent temperature; however, piles of soil  inside the bottle and above the branches are also recommended; the order of the items bottom up is this:
a.       Hole;
b.      Roots;
c.       Soil covering the roots and the grafting point in winter (grafting point outside in summer to prevent wild branches from growing);
d.      Loose soil above the rose, covering it preferably entirely;
e.      Plastic bottle – the soil inside will still get enough humidity from the area around the rose;

  Newly planted climbers in plastic bottles filled with soil and ready for winter

Newly planted climbers in plastic bottles filled with soil and ready for winter


3.       Cover the plant with straw, especially for climbers which will bloom on last year’s branches; this protects them from freezing; the climber in the second picture below is not entirely protected – it will get more straw during the following days; so try to cover as much of it as possible.

Straw protection for roses
Straw protection


  One of our Swan Lake climbers, covered partially in straw

One of our Swan Lake climbers, covered partially in straw
Please find parts 1 to 5 here: http://10000-roses.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

Create Your Very Own Rose Garden with Minimum Costs - Part 3 - Make Your Roses



First of all you need an older rose from a friend’s garden or from someone allowing you to cut their roses. Make sure you see the rose in full bloom to be sure it’s the type you want. You might have surprises later if you don’t see it for yourself.

  Our first rose, unknown variety

Our first rose, unknown variety
Tools you need: sharp garden scissors, knife, 2, 2.5, 3 or 5 liter plastic bottles with caps (5 l = 1 gallon approximately), whatever transparent, plastic bottles with cap that you have available;
Recommended time: August - September when roses are in full bloom;

Then, follow the next steps:

-      Choose a flower that has just been in bloom but has recently lost its petals. You will see only the petals’ holder left on the stick and a few leaves. Make sure the petals have recently fallen off and the plant is still all green. Dry pieces of the plant may cause failure;

-       After selecting your flower (or better said “former-flower”) cut it off the plant and make sure you obtain a piece of plant of about 10-15cm (4-6 inches); it’s just like picking a flower, but with no petals. Make sure you cut the flower off with the sharp scissors. Don’t just break it off with your hand. A clean cut increases your rate of success;


-     After cutting the amount of flowers you want, select the exact same number of plastic bottles for them. Make sure the bottles are not green or dark brown (from beer for example). Clear bottles allow light to enter and this will help your new baby roses in spring when their first leaves crave for the light. I did this mistake and I had no new roses under dark bottles by spring;


-    Select a place in your garden preferably sunny, but moist. However, if this is not possible, watering the flowers often can take care of the moist part;


-     Dig holes, fill them with loose soil combined with some old manure (about 10-20 % manure), water the soil thoroughly and then stick the little plant parts directly into the mud, about 30 cm ( 12 inches) far from each other;

Holes for the roses
Holes for the roses

-    Cut the bottom of the plastic bottles with the knife and place each bottle on top of each rose taking the cap off to allow water and air inside;

-      Pour water into the bottle through the bottle neck at least 2-3 times a week, even more often if the weather is dry; 1 liter (a quarter of a gallon) for each rose should be enough;

-       Do this until winter or rainy season comes when you no longer need to;

-     When cold times start (November or depending of the weather in your region) put the caps on the bottles and stop watering them. Make sure to have the caps on when temperatures go below 5 degrees Celsius (41 degrees Fahrenheit);

Roses in bottles preparing for winter
Some of the new roses from our garden, all planted in 2012 with the use of the method above

-      Keep the bottles like this until spring. When temperatures start growing and are above 10-15 degrees Celsius (50-59 Fahrenheit) you can take the lids off and allow the air to come inside the bottles. The scope of the bottles is to keep the new baby roses inside mini green houses;

-    If the ground is dry you can start watering the roses again preparing them to be moved to the final place you have assigned for them in the garden;

-    If temperatures are around 15 degrees Celsius (59 Fahrenheit), you can even remove the bottles and allow the plants to breathe;

-    In late March or April you can dig out the new baby roses and move them to their final assigned place. By then they should even have 5 or even fresher leaves. If you can, it is preferable to place them in their final place from the beginning. Moving them may cause some to die.



Schonbrunn Gardens – Vienna, Austria
Schonbrunn Gardens – Vienna, Austria


Good luck. Our first success rate in 2011 was 50%. We had 5 new baby roses out of 10 plant parts. Now in 2012 it’s 100%.

Fresh roses from our garden
Fresh roses from our garden

                Also, there’s also the option of buying the roses you want, but that means money and we are talking here about a garden done with minimum costs. If you would like to buy some varieties and then use the techniques above to create more, that’s also possible. I did buy some of the varieties I have, but half of them I got from family, friends and neighbors.
                If you decide to buy your roses or if you are lucky to receive them as present, the steps for planting them are below:
1.       Dig a hole large enough for the roots to fit comfortably inside;
2.       If too long, you can cut the roots a bit, but not too much because they contain valuable nutrients;
3.       Place the roses inside the holes;


Roses placed in their holes – all are Tea Hybrids

4.       Cover the roots with soil, press the soil thoroughly with your feet to make sure that no air is trapped inside; leave a small ditch around it to allow water to penetrate the soil slowly and not flow away;
Rose covered with permanent soil
Rose covered with permanent soil

5.       Water thoroughly; if the water gets absorbed easily, pour some more; the rose needs plenty of water when planted, but not that much later on; roses need abundant but rare watering sessions;
6.       If all the above are done in spring, you are done; if you are planting in autumn, follow steps below also:
7.  The branches can be cut if too long (up to the length in the picture above), but it is not recommended if frost is coming – they are more vulnerable – better leave them as they are. Pour loose soil above the rose branches trying to cover them entirely;
8.       For even better protection, you can place a plastic bottle above the soil (with its bottom cut off), but this stage is not mandatory;
9.       In spring, remove the loose soil, leaving the branches and the grafting point outside to enjoy the warm sun;

That’s it! Enjoy your roses.

Please find parts 1 to 5 here: http://10000-roses.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html